You submitted a job application and are excited about getting an opportunity to interview for your dream job. You are refreshing your inbox constantly looking for a response. But you didn’t receive any response from employer and you wonder what might have happened? The hiring process can drag on for weeks (and sometimes months). Taking follow up is right thing but before sending a follow up email/call, review few things.

Reread the Job Description

Reread the job description. Pay attention to dates or timelines that may be included in the posting. In the job posting, a company may mention when the application window closes. Once you apply, you wouldn’t want to follow up prior to that date.

Wait for atleast 1 Week

While you might want to follow up on a job application just a few days after submitting it, you should probably wait a little longer. Unless the job posting specifically states the application closing window, in which case that gives you a target date for follow-up, waiting about a week or two before following up on applications is a good rule of thumb. In general, this gives the hiring team enough time on their end to review received applications.

Be Professional

Just because you sent in your application or spoke with the hiring manager doesn’t mean that you’re best buddies. Being overly personal or casual is a mistake. Recruiters and hiring managers are friendly, and it is their job to talk to several people about a position. They don’t, however, have time to become personal friends with everyone they interview. Even if your initial interaction was excellent, be professional and respect personal boundaries when following up on job applications.

Be Respectful

In some scenarios, the job listing might state that applicants not call or email for their status. If that’s the case, you should abide by the employer’s wishes and refrain from reaching out. Although it can be frustrating to wait it out, you shouldn’t follow up – even though you really want to. If you ignore the request, the recruiter will think you either did not read the job listing carefully or that you don’t follow directions well.

Pick the Right Day

If there are two days to avoid following up with someone, they are Mondays and Fridays. Monday is often a busy transition day as people move back into work mode. As for Friday, if the person doesn’t see your email, it may get buried under a weekend’s worth of emails. Ideally, stick with Tuesday through Thursday for following up on job applications.

Use Your Connections

Maybe your former colleague is friends with one of the execs at the new company you want to work for. Go through your business and personal contacts to see if you know anyone who can help you get your foot in the door—or get your resume placed at the head of the pile. Explain the role that you’re looking to get, and everything that qualifies you for the job, such as your education, skills set, and work experience. But don’t stop there—be sure to offer your assistance to the person, too. That way, they might be more amenable to helping you as well.

You can also use online networking tools like LinkedIn to see if you have anyone in your network who might have a connection to the company you’d like to work for. If you do, you can always reach out and see if that person has some inside intel on the job. Depending on your relationship with the person, you might be able to ask for a recommendation or for the person to put in a good word for you.

Don’t take it personally if you don’t hear back from a hiring manager in a few days. Remember they are reviewing several people for the role and are busy with the hiring process. Don’t be desperate and say how badly you need this job. Best wishes!

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